Luke 2:40-52

  1. Verse 49. What was the consequence in his life of Jesus’ unique relationship to God?
    In what does this truth apply to us, as sons of God?
    Cf. John 14:31.
  2. How does the story illustrate the truths of verses 40 and 52?
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Luke 2:1-39

  1. What may we learn from the circumstances of our Saviour’s birth, and the status of his first worshippers?
  2. What do the angel’s message and the rejoicing of the heavenly host teach us of the importance of the birth of Jesus?
    How is the shepherds’ response to this message an example to us?
  3. Verses 1-7. How do these verses illustrate that God controls all human affairs, bringing about his own purpose through the free actions of men?
    Cf. with verse 4, Mic.5:2.
  4. What did the appearance of Jesus mean to Simeon and to Anna?
    What, according to verses 30-32, was to be the scope of his work?
  5. Verses 34, 35. What was to be the effect of Jesus’ coming on different classes of people?
    What would be the cause of men’s falling and rising/ Cf. 1 Pet. 2:6-8.

Note

  1. Verses 21-24. After the circumcision of a child, two rites had to be performed: first, his presentation to God (verses 22, 23; cf. Exod. 13:2); second, the sacrifice of purification for the mother (verse 24; cf Lev. 12:2-8).
  2. Verse 25. ‘Waiting for the consolation of Israel’: i.e., for the coming of the Messiah. Cf. verse 38 and 24:21.

Luke 1: 57-80

The song of Zechariah may be divided thus: verses 68 – 70, thanks to God for the coming of the Messiah; verses 71-75, the purpose of the Messiah’s coming; verse 76, 77, the mission of john; verses 78,79, a further picture of the Messiah’s coming.

  1. Trace in the song of Zechariah the successive stages in the unfolding of God’s plan of Salvation through the Old Testament and up to the coming of the Messiah.
    How does it reveal the unity of the Old and New testaments?
  2. What, according to this song, is the purpose of salvation?
    Is this your experience?

Notes

  1. Verse 69. ‘A horn of salvation’: i.e., one who is strong to save.
    The horn of an animal was a common symbol of strength; cf. Ps. 18:2.
  2. Verse 80. ‘The desert’: the desolate region around the Jordan and the.
    Dead Sea.

Luke 1: 26-56

  1. Verses 31-33, 35. How many features of the person and mission of the promised child can be discerned in the words of the angel?
    Make a list of them.
  2. Contrast Mary’s reception of the angel’s message with that of Zechariah (see previous study, Question 2).
    Cf. verse 45. What did Mary’s response involve?
    Are you prepared similarly to ask the Lord to fulfil his word in you?
  3. What does Mary’s song reveal about:
    (a) the character of God (see especially verses 49, 50), and
    (b) His way of working among men (verses 51-53)?
    How were these facts demonstrated in the manner of the Saviour’s coming
  4. What features in Mary’s character are revealed in this song?
    What can we learn from her example?

 

Note. Verse 31. ‘Jesus’ is the Greek from of Joshua, which means ‘God saves’. Cf. Matt. 1:21.

 

Luke 1:1-25

  1. What was the mission assigned to John the Baptist?
    What was to be the nature of his greatness (verse 15)? Cf. verses 76, 77.
  2. What was the cause of Zechariah’s punishment (verse 20)?
    What made him hesitate to believe the angel’s message?
    What similar temptations to unbelief do you face?
    Why ought Zechariah to have believed and why ought we to believe?
  3. Verses 1-4. What do these verses tell us of:
    (a) the sources of Luke’s information,
    (b) the importance that he attached to giving a truthful record, and
    (c) his purpose in writing the Gospel?

Note. Verses 3.The title ‘most excellent’ suggests that Theophilus was a high official, probably not a Christian, but with some knowledge of and interest in Christianity.

Ruth 4

  1. What example are we given in chapter 4 on matters affecting the rights of others?

Note. 3:12. ‘Near of kin’. The Hebrew word (goel, meaning ‘next of kin’) has a technical meaning in Hebrew law. The next of kin had certain duties and privileges, among them being that of redeeming the land or person of a kinsman who had been compelled to sell his land or himself through poverty (cf. Lev. 25:25, 47-49). To draw a portion of a kinsman’s mantle over oneself (3:9) was the legal way of claiming protection and redemption price in full. Cf. 4:4-6; Gal. 3:13, 14.

 

Ruth3

  1. How does the whole story show the Lord’s loving-kindness to those who trust him?
    Cf. Lam. 3:22-26, 31-33; Nah. 1:7; Rom. 8:28.
  2. Note. 3:12. ‘Near of kin’. The Hebrew word (goel, meaning ‘next of kin’) has a technical meaning in Hebrew law. The next of kin had certain duties and privileges, among them being that of redeeming the land or person of a kinsman who had been compelled to sell his land or himself through poverty (cf. Lev. 25:25, 47-49). To draw a portion of a kinsman’s mantle over oneself (3:9) was the legal way of claiming protection and redemption price in full.