Numbers 36

  1. What was the principle lying behind the request of the daughters of Zelophehad, and to what did the request lead?
    What was the importance of all this?
  2. What was Moses’ overriding concern before his death?
    How was Joshua’s commission different from that of Moses?
    Was it inferior?

Numbers 35

  1. What can we learn from chapter 35 concerning God’s standards of judgment as regards manslaughter and murder?

Numbers 34

  1. What details standout in this statistical account which make one aware of the particular interests and concerns of Moses (See 33:2) the ‘statistician? What does he wants his readers to take note of and remember?
  2. The theme of entry into a promised inheritance appears several times in the News Testament. Cf. especially Acts 20:32; Rom. 8:17; Gal. 3:29; Her.6:11, 12.Heb.11 makes it clear that our real inheritance teach us about preparing for and claiming our true inheritance? To what warnings ought we to pay attention?

Numbers 33

  1. What details standout in this statistical account which make one aware of the particular interests and concerns of Moses (See 33:2) the ‘statistician?
    What does he wants his readers to take note of and remember?

Numbers 32

  1. What was wrong with the request of Reuben and Gad?
    What was the result that Moses feared might arise from it, and on what conditions only could it be granted? Why is this event particularly significant for Israel as it arrives in the promised land, and begins to from itself into a tribal confederacy?
    How will its future life as a ‘nation’ differ from all that it has been up to now?
  2. What great principle with regard to sin and its consequences is expressed in verse 23?
    Can you think of instances in Scripture which illustrate its working? Cf. Gal. 6:7, 8.

Note. Verses 1-5. The tribes of Reuben and Gad understandably thought the land of Jazer and Gilead would suit their large herds of cattle. But their self-willed choice brought their descendants into constant trouble in later times. The territory lacked natural frontiers and was somewhat isolated and exposed to attack. Often in later centuries the other tribes had to come to their rescue. Cf. 1 Sam. 11; 1 Kgs. 22:3.

Numbers 31

  1. This is another difficult passage unless you bear in mind:
    (a) that it records only the bare outline of an event far greater in scope;
    (b) that it is recorded from a particular standpoint (the Midianite account was probably quite different from this one) ; and
    (c) that its message concerns a God of love who must purge of evil everything that is his.
    What are the forms of purging found in this account?
    In what direction ought a Christian to act with comparable severity? Cf. Col. 3:5-11.
  2. What does the chapter teach about sharing and giving?
    On What grounds were portions given to the priests and Levites?

Numbers 30

  1. How does this chapter show our responsibility in speech?
    Cf. Matt. 5:33-37; 12:36.
  2. Do you think the woman’s relationship to father and husband should be viewed a merely local Israelite custom, or is there an implied principle that holds in the twentieth century too?