1 Samuel 25 and 26

  1. Nabal was rich and satisfied; but what did he lack?
    What in contract, were the outstanding features of Abigail’s character?
    Can you think of situation where you could act as she did?
  2. Chapter 26. What basic convictions motivated David’s actions?
    How does his faith in God’s purpose for him stand out?
    In particular, what principle emerges from 25:39 and 26:10, 23?

 Notes

26:19, 20. To be driven out of the promised land (cf. 27:1) is to be driven out not from the dominion of the Lord (see many psalms), but certainly from his special covenanted presence to lands where other gods are worshipped.

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1 Samuel 25 and 26

  1. Nabal was rich and satisfied; but what did he lack?
    What in contract, were the outstanding features of Abigail’s character?
    Can you think of situation where you could act as she did?
  2. Chapter 26. What basic convictions motivated David’s actions?
    How does his faith in God’s purpose for him stand out?
    In particular, what principle emerges from 25:39 and 26:10, 23?

 Notes

26:19, 20. To be driven out of the promised land (cf. 27:1) is to be driven out not from the dominion of the Lord (see many psalms), but certainly from his special covenanted presence to lands where other gods are worshipped.

1 Samuel 23 and 24

  1. In what ways did God’s protecting hand cover David, and what special encouragements did he receive?
    Cf. Ps. 37:23, 24.
  2. What held David back from killing Saul when it was in his power to do it, and when his followers were urging him on?
    What virtues shine out in his self-restraint, and what lessons do you learn from this?
    Cf. Rom. 12:19, 20.
  3. Were Saul’s words and weeping accompanied by a real change of heart?

 Notes.

  1. 24:13, 14. David uses the proverb to demonstrate his innocence. The wicked action one would expect from a wicked man has not been forthcoming in his case. ‘A dead dogs? A flea?’: something harmless, elusive, unimportant.
  2. 24:20, 21. Saul apparently knew God’s purpose, though he strove to avert some of its consequences.

1 Samuel 21:10-22:23

  1. Do you gather from 21:10-15 and 22:3-5 that David’s flights out of the holy land were done without God’s guidance?
    What seems to have determined David’s actions?
    Contrast 22:23. Are you free from the fear of men? Cf. Prov. 29:25.
  2. Consider the character of the motley crew of which David now became the leader.
    Why did they turn to him?
    How can God today transform any group under Christian leadership?
    Cf. 1 Cor. 6:9-11; note especially the phrase, ‘such were some of you’.
  3. Read the story of 22:7-19 in the light of Prov. 6:34; 14:30; 27:4. How can the Christian be zealous without being jealous? Cf. 1 Kgs. 19:10, 14; John 2:17.

1 Samuel 17:55-19:24

  1. How were fear and jealousy like a cancer in Saul’s spirit?
    How did they show themselves?
    How do you explain God’s action in this matter?
    By what means were Saul’s attempts to destroy David foiled?
  2. How did Jonathan and Michal show their love for David?
    Do we ever risk any thing for our friends?
    See 1 John 3:16, 18.

 Notes

  1. 18:5. ‘So successfully’: a pregnant Hebrew word is used meaning ‘deal wisely’ with the implied consequence of success. Cf. Is. 52:13a
  2. 18:10. Cf. 1Kgs. 22:22.
  3. 19:13. ‘An idol’: Hebrew ‘teraphim’, i.e., household gods; cf. Gen. 31:19. This deceived Saul’s messengers into thinking that David was ill in bed.
  4. 19:23, 24. Cf. Is 20:2; Mic. 1:8, Saul lay in a trance for a day and a night. The origin of the proverb about Saul is recorded in 10:12. His behavior here evidently caused men to recollect it.

1 Samuel 17:1-54

  1. What was it that made David view the situation differently, and gave him courage, when all the men of Israel were much afraid?
    Cf. Ps. 42:5, 11; Is. 51:12, 13.
  2. How did David’s past experiences of the Lord’s deliverance give him confidence to face the present challenge? What practical lessons does this teach about:
    (a) the value of remembering, and
    (b) the importance of proving God’s presence and power in ordinary daily living?
  3. What do you think of Saul’s reasoning (verse 33), and of his provision for David (verses 38, 39)?
    What was lacking? See verse 47.

Notes

  1. Verses 4ff. The giant was over nine feet (3 metres) tall, and carried 125 pounds (about 57 kg) of armour.
  2. Verses 18. ‘Some assurance’: i.e., that they are well, etc.

1 Samuel 16

  1. How is true obedience illustrated in Samuel’s behavior?
    What can you learn from his example?
  2. What great truth was brought home to Samuel at Bethlehem?
    Consider how this truth is emphasized in Jesus’ teaching. See Matt. 6:1; 7:15, etc. Cf. Rom. 2:28, 29.
  3. Here men twice sent to fetch David; why?
    When he comes into sight, what do we learn about him? Make a list of his characteristics.
    What was the chief evidence that God had chosen him and rejected Saul?
    Cf. 2 Cor. 1:22.

 Note. Verses 21, 22. David became an ‘armour-bearer’ – possibly a military title.